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irstly, dear reader, you must forgive the fact that in the technologically disadvantaged days of 2001, my digital camera shot a mere 1.5 megapixels. For that I ask your forgiveness! I began my travels in Zagreb where I stayed with a friend I'd gotten to know in Munich and who'd moved back home. From there I went southwards, where the war damage began around 40 kilometers outside of Zagreb. Though a few rockets did manage to reach the capital, the actual war never did and though the city is a bit dreary, it was at least intact. Yet, not long after my bus left the city for Plitvice national park, the damage became apparent.

Croatia, I found, was more similar to other developing countries in eastern Europe than Bosnia was. The Dalmation coast was a prime tourist destination in the past and has been quickly regaining lost ground. Though the Croatians I met had countless problems to tell me of, a few days in the country was already enough to see that Croatia is that city block where middle class neighborhoods meet ghettos so to say. While it has indeed moved into the European orbit, it remains on the outer edge vulnerable to instability next door. I wouldn't realize until I crossed the border into Bosnia, but the historical borders of east and west dating back to boundary between Austria-Hungary and the Ottoman Empire were just as real during my time there as they were a hundred years ago.


Contrary to what the show below may appear to be, it's actually a very small and was part of a stream running near the side of a path.

One of the best shots I took and have taken (sadly in such bad resolution), it was just starting to rain as I walked by the various lakes of Plitvice.


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