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Taken from my campsite near the beach. It was unfortunately full of noisy Germans and Dutch. I left the next day.

Vis is the farthest Croatian island from the coast. I took a highspeed ferry there with some friends of my friend in Zagreb. I spent about 5 days on the island which had only two small cities on each side of the island. The one I stayed in consisted of about three streets running parallel to the horshoe shaped harbor and that was all. They produced their own wine, olive oil, tea and other things. Rampant alcoholism was apparently a problem there as well as serious economic difficulty.

Dubrovnik is said to be the pearl of the Adriatic. After from Vis to another island named Hvar, I went back to Split and took the bus south to Dubrovnik, driving through the short 10 mile stretch of Bosnia which creates a coastal fragment of Croatia. The shot below was taken above the city walls which cost a whopping 2 or 3 bucks to walk around. The city was shelled heavily by Serb artillary mounted on nearby hills and looking closely at the color of rooftops gives you a good idea of how much was rebuilt, around 67% according to what I read. Walking around the walls reveals more damage yet to be fixed.

Dubrovnik has swelled far beyond its city walls but inside, though picturesque, has become hideously touristy. The unparalleled city walls which 500 years ago were repelling attacks by foreigners and defending the city are now used to attract and lure in foreigners to its high prices, lack of atmosphere and generally crowded old town which offers enough photo shops, exchange offices, bad pizza places and overpriced cafes for the entire country 10 times over. Nevertheless, tourism will play a very large part in reviving post-war Croatia.

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